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September 23, 2009: The UN & Law Review

Jennifer A. Lincoln 

September 23, 2009

The UN and Law Review

I went to the UN to see Ban Ki-Moon and the illustrious Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, co-authors of "Half the Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunity for Women Worldwide" speak. I had not heard Ban Ki-Moon before, so I was ecstatic when Pace International Law Review sent out an invite for this event. Being that I worked at the UN in Den Haag last summer, I was more than happy to add the Secretary General to my growing list of political celebrities whom I have heard speak/testify. Other recent conquests include Radovan Karadzic and Charles Taylor. Ban Ki-Moon speaks in a heavy Korean accent, which is difficult to ignore, despite the sobriety inherent in subjects such as "gendercide," on which the talk was focused.

I am positively bent on getting an article published this semester. I am focusing a guided research project on developments in international law concerning the distinction between deportation and forcible transfer, particularly, how the international community treats transfer over de facto (opposed to de jure) borders. Traditionally, deportation meant carrying civilians outside of their resident nation. Now, there is an added crime, forcible transfer, which is solidifying within International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia jurisprudence and elsewhere in customary law. This crime describes transfer within national borders. Problems arise when transfer is within the same nation lawfully but over the border of occupied territory (is- outside of Republika Srpska to Muslim Bosnia). I did not want to touch Israel on this (because everything on earth has been written about Israel), but the Security Council resolutions referenced in the jurisprudence suggest it is a must.

  

Jennifer A. Lincoln

Year:
3L Day (Class of 2010)

Concentration:
International Law

Hometown:
Hingham, Massachusetts

Undergraduate degree:
BA in History from Trinity College, Hartford, CT

Activities:
Jessup International Moot Court team, 2008-2010, Human Rights in Action (HRIA): United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (2009); Phi Alpha Delta (PAD) legal fraternity; Hearsay newspaper staff; International Law Society (ILS); Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (SALDF)